Curling Categories

The World Curling Federation organises International events across many disciplines.  These disciplines are listed below with a brief description and Australia’s participation.

A summary of all Australian International results from all disciplines is found at the World Curling Federation website: http://results.worldcurling.org/Association/Details/30 

Men’s

An Olympic discipline since 1998, the Men’s format is a team of 4 Male players, with an optional alternate, of any age.  Australia has competed internationally in this event since 1991 with highest placing of 6th at a World Championships, and 7th at an Olympic Games in 1992.

Women’s

An Olympic discipline since 1998, the Women’s format is a team of 4 Female players, with an optional alternate, of any age.  Australia has competed internationally in this event since 1991 with highest placing of 2nd at the Pacific Curling Championships.

Mixed Doubles

An Olympic discipline since 2018, the format of Mixed Doubles is 2 players, 1 female and 1 male.  Australia has competed in this event since 2008 with a highest placing of 4th at the World Championships in 2019 by Dean Hewitt and Tahli Gill.

Wheelchair

A Paralympic discipline since 2006.  Australia has never had representation in the Paralympic Sport of Wheelchair curling.  We are currently developing a program to recruit and increase participation with the goal of building a National Team in the next few years.  For WCF wheelchair competitions, each on-ice team must have four players delivering stones and must be comprised of both genders at all times during games

Para-athletes must be classified and deemed eligible for the Wheelchair Curling discipline to represent Australia Internationally.  The classification rules you can download from the World Curling Federation site provide insights into eligibility.  Please contact Ian Palangio at ipalangio@hotmail.com if you are interested in getting involved in Wheelchair Curling – and for social events/leagues and “having a go” the classification rules are not enforced.

Junior Men

The Junior Men comprises a team of 4 players, and an optional alternate.  To be eligible to play in the World Junior Curling Championships (WJCC) and qualifying events, a player must be less than 21 years of age by the end of the 30th day of June of the year immediately preceding the year in which the championship is to take place.  The Junior Men have competed for Australia since 2003 with a best result of 9th place at the World Junior “B” Curling Championships in 2003.

Junior Women

The Junior Women comprises a team of 4 players, and an optional alternate.  To be eligible to play in the World Junior Curling Championships (WJCC) and qualifying events, a player must be less than 21 years of age by the end of the 30th day of June of the year immediately preceding the year in which the championship is to take place.  The Junior Women have competed for Australia since 2003 with a best result of 7th place at the World Junior “B” Curling Championships in 2003.

Mixed Curling

Each team shall have two male and two female players and the male and
female players must deliver stones alternately (M, F, M, F – or – F, M, F,
M). No alternate players are permitted.  Australia has competed at the World Mixed Curling Championships since 2015 and has finished with a best result of 19th.

Senior Men

The Senior Men’s team comprises a team of 4 players, and an option alternate.  To be eligible to play in the World Senior Curling Championships (WSCC) and qualifying events, a player must be not less than 50 years of age by the end of the 30th day of June of the year immediately preceding the year in which the championship is to take place.  Australia has competed in the Senior Men’s World Championships since 2003, and have won a Bronze Medal on 3 occasions.

Senior Women

The Senior Women’s team comprises a team of 4 players, and an option alternate.  To be eligible to play in the World Senior Curling Championships (WSCC) and qualifying events, a player must be not less than 50 years of age by the end of the 30th day of June of the year immediately preceding the year in which the championship is to take place.  Australia has competed in the Senior Women’s World Championships since 2013, and have had a highest placing of 7th.